Cuisine of the Caribbean

The vibrant cuisine of the Caribbean islands will set your taste buds ablaze!

Steakchicken, and every variety of seafood served in the Caribbean is cooked with distinct spices and ingredients native to the region. Some well-known Caribbean cuisine includes key lime pie, barbecued ribs served with guava sauce, chicken kabobsjerk chicken, and coconut shrimp.

Foods of the Caribbean - PapayaPapaya

This delectable fleshy fruit grows wild in many parts of the Caribbean as well as on farms. There are two varieties: yellow and orange. When freshly picked it is served plain with a squeeze of lime for a healthy, delightful breakfast. It is also used in salads and even stews. However, papaya mixed into a cocktail with golden Caribbean rum is one of the favorite ways to enjoy!

Foods of the Caribbean - JerkJerk

Jerk is THE signature flavour of Jamaica and one of the Caribbean’s most famous cuisines.The tantalizing, aromatic spices are hot, hot, hot! Jerk refers to a very spicy dry or wet rub that is applied to pork, chicken, goat, fish and any other meat. It is left to marinade and absorb all the exotic flavors. The meat is then smoked or grilled to fiery perfection. There are a great variety of Jerk preparations with influences from Latin America to Portugal to Africa.

Foods of the Caribbean - Roast porkRoast pork

In those areas of the Caribbean with a strong Spanish heritage, like the Dominican Republic and Cuba, roast pork is often served with rice, beans and plantains. Succulent and juicy, pork drippings give everything on the plate a rich flavour. Roadside stands across Puerto Rico serve the much-loved lechón asado, which is spit-roasted suckling pig.

Foods of the Caribbean - Caribbean Pepperpot StewCaribbean Pepperpot Stew

Just as the name suggests, this one is not for the faint of heart. Simmered in huge pots across the Caribbean, this thick and rich stew can include aubergine (eggplant), okra, squash, potatoes and pretty much anything else that grows in the islands’ rich earth. Beef is the most common meat, while fungi – tasty cornmeal dumplings – add texture. It’s called souse in the Bahamas, possibly referring to the cook,since no two or even batches come out the same!

Foods of the Caribbean - Conch SaladConch Salad

A sort of sea escargot, conch is any of the many different large sea snails that are housed in beautiful shells. Something like a huge clam, the meat makes fabulous fritters – a staple in the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands and cruise-ship ports everywhere. Conch also appears in salads, soups and stews. Most conch meat is from farm-raised conches, leaving nature to its splendid beauty.

Foods of the Caribbean - Arroz Con PolloArroz Con Pollo 

Arroz Con Pollo is the ultimate island comfort food. Wildly popular where Spanish influences remain strong, this simplistic dish is a blend of flavor’s that include peppers, tomatoes, garlic, and more. Baked until the rich scents fill the kitchen, most would say their mother’s version is best.

Foods of the Caribbean - Cuban sandwichCuban sandwich

One Cuban export that has found favor across the Caribbean and is quickly going global is this hearty sandwich that was once the lunchtime meal for laborers in Havana. Soft, crusty white bread is layered with ham, roast pork and mild white cheese. Dill pickles and vinegary yellow mustard provide accents. A sandwich press makes everything scrumptiously delicious.

Foods of the Caribbean - CallalooCallaloo

This vegetable dish has its roots in West Africa; Callaloo was brought to the Caribbean by slaves and is still a favorite in Jamaica, Dominica, Trinidad and Tobago.

If you’re from Guyana, Callaloo refers to all varieties of spinach (bhaji) but if you’re from Trinidad and Tobago, then Callaloo is one of the must-have soul food dishes of the Twin Island Republic. Callaloo for Trinis is a concoction of dasheen leaves (aka eddo leaves), crab,or salt meat, okra, along with onions, pimento peppers (a mild pepper), hot pepper, green onions and thyme all cooked low and slow in a bath of fresh coconut milk. 

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